Strolling through Tehran’s art galleries – Part III

Overview and sources

  1. “Warhol saved me”, exhibition by Khosrow Hassanzadeh at Iranshahr Gallery. Bio, photos.
  2. Painting exhibition by Ali Bazmandegan at Saless Gallery. Biophotos.
  3. “Sacred Garden”, exhibition by Anahita Ghazanfari at Shirin Gallery. Bio, photos.
  4. “100 works, 100 artists”, group exhibition at Golestan Gallery. Photos.
  5. Painting exhibition by Alireza Baghi at Hoor Gallery (collaboration with Emrooz Gallery). Photos, poster.
  6. “Inward regard 2”, exhibition by Faezeh Afjehniya at ECO Cultural Institute Tehran. Bio, photos, poster.
  7. “Human Being & Forgetfulness”, painting exhibition by Shirin Moayya at Ayrik Gallery. Bio, photos, poster.
  8. “Moment”, sculpture installation by Solmaz Lienhard at Ariana Gallery. Photos, poster.
  9. “Home is a name”, group exhibition (by Mona Najafizadeh, Miriam Hamann and Matin Soofipour) at A Gallery. Cooperation between Austrian and Iranian artists. The project will continue in January 2019 at Atelierhaus Salzamt in Linz. Photos, poster.
  10. “On the pictures”, exhibition by Pouya Parsamagham at Dastan Gallery. Photos and more.
  11. Painting exhibition by Sohrab Marzban at Shirin Gallery. Bio, photos.
  12. “Tehran to me”, conceptual costume exhibition at Mostaghel Gallery. Photos.
  13. “Corruption, Retooling, Connection”, installation by Arya Tabandehpoor at Mohsen Gallery. Bio, photos and more: mohsen.gallery, harpersbazaararabia.com.
  14. “Qajar”, painting exhibition by Ghasem Hajizadeh at Mah Gallery. Bio, photos.
  15. “Three bodies”, group exhibition (works by Shaqayeq Ahmadian, Farzad Shekari and Parisa Taghipour) at Aaran Gallery. Photos.
  16. 1st annual young adults drawing exhibition at Etemad Gallery. Photos.
  17. Artworks by Narges Baghermoradi at Iran Art Gallery. More (in Persian) and photos.
  18. “Living inside death”, drawing exhibition by Mojtaba Yadollahi at Seyhoun Gallery. More (in Persian) and photos.
  19. “Fifty years in Abbey Road”, retrospective of artworks by Hamid Nourkeyhani at Sayé Gallery. Bio, photos, photos.
  20. “Illusion and reality”, works by Mehrdad Sadri at Tehran Art Center. Bio, photos.
  21. “Beyond the grays”, painting exhibition by Aisan Mohammad at Shalman Gallery. Bio, photos, poster.
  22. “Four corners of imagination”, group exhibition at Iranian Artists Forum. Photos.
  23. “Live dolls”, painting exhibition by Manoochehr Soltani at Vista+. Photos and more.
  24. “In darkness”, painting exhibition by Mina Feshangchi at Vista Gallery. Photos and more.
  25. Painting exhibition by Shahin Kimiagar at Golestan Gallery. Photos.
  26. Painting exhibition by Hosna Karnama at Saless Gallery. Bio, artist’s page and photos.
  27. “In our jungle”, painting exhibition by Mozhdeh Sajadi at Shirin Gallery. Photos.
  28. “The empty space”, painting exhibition by Sedigheh Fatollahzadeh and Orhan Umut at Seyhoun Gallery. O. Umut’s bio, interview with S. Fatollahzadeh (in Persian) and photos.
  29. “Zelkova’s serenity”, painting exhibition by Ebrahim Ganjian at Atbin Gallery. More (in Persian), photos and poster.
  30. “the short stories of roseland”, painting exhibition by Ladan Broujerdi at Homa Gallery. Bio, photos.
  31. Exhibition by Norwegian photographer Mats Alexander Grenabo at Iranian Artists Forum. Grenabo’s instagram, photos.

Photo gallery: Lunar eclipse July 2018 in Iran

A total lunar eclipse took place on 27 July 2018: The Moon has passed through the centre of the Earth’s shadow.

This eclipse was the longest total lunar eclipse in the 21st century, since it occurred near apogee (the Moon’s orbit point farthest from the Earth). It lasted approximately 103 minutes. The moon remained at least partially in Earth’s shadow for a total of four hours. The eclipse occurred simultaneously with the perihelic opposition of Mars (Mars is closest to the Sun and particularly close to Earth), a coincidence that happens once every 25,000 years.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes within Earth’s umbra (shadow). As the eclipse begins, Earth’s shadow first darkens the Moon slightly. Then, the Earth’s shadow begins to “cover” part of the Moon, turning it a dark red-brown color (typically – the color can vary based on atmospheric conditions). The Moon appears to be reddish because of Rayleigh scattering (the same effect that causes sunsets to appear reddish) and the refraction of that light by Earth’s atmosphere into its umbra. The Moon’s brightness is exaggerated within the umbral shadow.

Sources: ANA, Fars News Agency 1, Fars 2, Fars 3, Fars 4, Fars 5, IRNA 1, IRNA 2, IRNA 3, ISNA, Mehr News Agency 1, MEHR 2, MEHR 3, MEHR 4, Tasnim News Agency 1, Tasnim 2, Young Journalists Club (YJC) 1, YJC 2, YJC 3, Wikipedia, timeanddate.com, NASA

Photo gallery: Fans in Iran celebrate the 2018 FIFA World Cup

During the world cup many Iranians watched the matches in cafés, restaurants, shops or public screenings. After each match people flooded the streets to celebrate and show their support for the team; Iran achieved their best performance at a world cup. They finished third in their group with four points and overall in 18th place out of 32 squads.*

An own goal by Aziz Bouhaddouz (90+5′) allowed Iran to win their first match 1:0 against Morocco. Spain won the second match 1:0 (Diego Costa 54′) but the Europeans struggled to create chances against a very disciplined Iran that defended brilliantly, showed plenty of tactical cohesion and looked dangerous going forward. Saeid Ezatolahi had a goal disallowed for offside.

The third match against Portugal ended in a draw 1:1 (Quaresma 45′; penalty Karim Ansarifard 90+3′). Morteza Pouraliganji rose up to the challenge and kept Cristiano Ronaldo in check. In the second half, Ali Beiranvand managed to save Ronaldo’s penalty kick. Seconds before the final whistle, Iran went all out for the winner and a desperate Saman Ghoddos effort was deflected onto the path of Mehdi Taremi who found himself one-on-one with Portuguese goalkeeper Rui Patricio. Taremi hit the wrong side of the netting, consigning his side to finishing third in their group. Iran needed all three points to advance to the knock-out stage.

In The Guardian, Paul Doyle rated Ali Beiravand’s overall performance with an 8 and chose the Iranian goalkeeper in his best eleven of the group stage.

*Note: In 1978, Iran finished in 14th place out of 16 participants on their first World Cup appearance.

Sources: Borna News Agency, Fars News Agency (FNA) 1, FNA 2, IRNA 1, IRNA 2, IRNA 3, IRNA 4, IRNA 5, IRNA 6, IRNA 7, ISNA 1, ISNA 2, ISNA 3, ISNA 4, ISNA 5, ISNA 6, Mehr News Agency (MNA) 1, MNA 2, MNA 3, MNA 4, MNA 5, MNA 6, MNA 7, MNA 8, MNA 9, Tasnim News Agency (TNA) 1, TNA 2, Tehran Picture Agency (TPA) 1, TPA 2, TPA 3, Young Journalists Club (YJC) 1, YJC 2, YJC 3, YJC 4, YJC 5, YJC 6, YJC 7, AFC, The Guardian (TG) 1, TG 2, Wikipedia 1, Wikipedia 2, Wikipedia 3

FIFA World Cup 2018: Iran’s team and fans in Russia (Photos)

Reza Ghoochannejhad – The violinist who understands seven languages
Reza scored the only Iranian goal in the World Cup 2014. Besides football, the forward is known for his skills with the violin and for languages; he speaks English, Dutch, Persian and French. Additionally he has a good understanding of German, Italian and Portuguese.

He played in the youth national team of the Netherlands and, at the age of 21, he wanted to leave football to study law. He was convinced by Marc Overmars, the winger that played in Barcelona, to stick to football. He wants to finish his studies when he retires from football. “The people who know me know that there is something more than football for me”. His sister-in-law is Sareh Bayat, a famous Iranian actress who participated in the 2012 Oscar-winning film “Nader and Simín, a separation”. After Iran’s win against Morocco with an own goal by Bouhaddouz, he took a moment to console his opponent on Instagram:

“I don’t know you personally but in life, sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. Don’t let this own goal bring you down. We are all professional sportsmen and this is a part of football. I am so happy and proud of my team and my country, but wanted to wish you also all the best in your career. Reza”.

Sardar Azmoun – The Iranian “Messi”
Sardar, 23 years old, is compared to the crack of Barça due to his ability. A comparison that, however, the striker of Rubin Kazan rejects immediately. “I do not know why they say I’m the new Messi, my game has nothing to do, maybe it’s because we use the same boots,” he says. Azmoun was born in Gonbad-e Kavus to a family of Turkmen origin from Iran’s Sunni minority. He started his career in Sepahan FC (Isfahan, Iran).

As top scorer in the league and for the national team he is the favorite of the masses beloved by the fans and his team members. He is addicted to social networks. When he was younger, he was summoned by the Iranian sub-15 volleyball team due to his height (1.86 meters) and the conditions inherited from his father, a former player. He is also passionate about horses.

Alireza Jahanbakhsh – The child that fell in love with football at the world cup
Alireza Jahanbakhsh is Iran’s biggest threat in attack. The winger of AZ Alkmaar is 2017-18 Eredivise’s top scorer. He scored 21 goals and also distributed 12 assists! “It’s not bad to play as a winger” he says. Neither for a child who, until 12, preferred gymnastics, handball and indoor football over football. Jahanbakhsh, who got hooked on football watching the 1998 World Cup, grew up admiring Iranian winger Mahdavikia, but now he adores Cristiano Ronaldo: “He’s my role model, I always try to learn from him.” His determination and work are exemplary. He is simply the best in the world.”

Milad Mohammadi – The twin nicknamed Road Runner
Milad Mohammadi is a fullback/left winger that plays for Akhmat Grozny in Chechnya. He has a twin brother, Mehrdad, who plays for Sepahan FC. Fans nicknamed Milad “Mig-Mig”, as in the cartoon The Coyote and the Road Runner, due to his speed.

Saeid Ezatolahi – The Persian Pogba with a short stop in Atlético
21-year-old central midfielder Saeid Ezatolahi is the youngest member of the squad in Russia. He wrote Iranian football history as the youngest player to score with the national team.
Son of a trainer, he was nicknamed the Persian Pogba and at the end of the summer of 2014, with 17, he signed for Atlético de Madrid for four years. He played in the quarterfinals of the UEFA Youth League.
“He was a very polite and respectful player. Always wondering about all the tactical aspects to learn as much as possible. He even asked to stay longer to do specific workouts sometimes”, recalls Armando de la Morena, the coach he had in Spain. During the April 2015 transfer window Ezatolahi trained with Cholo Simeone at Cerro del Espino. In July 2015 he transferred to Russia’s Rostov.

Masoud – Or how to overcome four serious injuries
Masoud Shojaei is best known in Spain because he played for Osasuna and Las Palmas. In Pamplona he learned, what it meant to play under pressure in football’s top competitions, with all eyes right on top of him. He had four surgeries after a broken metatarsal during the 2011-2012 season. It took him 16 months to recover, six of them on crutches. After having problems with the regime, he is now back as captain of the Iran squad.

Ghoddos – The Iranian, who came out of the cold of… Sweden
Saman Ghoddos (24 years old) was born in Malmö, Sweden and he received his Iranian nationality last year. He neither knew until then the majority of those who are now his teammates. The match against Spain was his tenth game defending Iran. The midfielder/forward is the son of Iranian immigrants, who never forgot their roots – celebrating Nowruz and Chahar Shanbeh Suri in Sweden. He played two friendlies with the Swedish national team, scoring once.
Ghoddos plays in Östersunds FC. Arsenal’s coach Arsene Wenger praised him after a Europa League match: “Technically and tactically, I was impressed by him”. Ghoddos club did not want to sell him this winter to Celta de Vigo.

Dejagah – Boateng’s friend and owner of a restaurant
Ashkan Dejagah, midfielder of Nottingham Forest since January, sees Kevin Prince Boateng as his brother. The German-born Ghanaian midfielder wished him luck on Instagram in the first game. In January he opened a sushi restaurant in Berlin. He represented Germany at youth levels, where he met Neuer, Höwedes, Khedira, Özil … before playing in Wolfsburg and Fulham. He has Berlin and Tehran tattooed on each of his arms along with the legend “Never forget where you come from”.

Morteza Pouraliganji – Teammate of Xavi Hernández in Al Saad
Morteza Pouraliganji is, with only 26 years, the head of Iran’s defense. He plays in Al Saad of Qatar, Xavi’s team, where he arrived two years ago despite the offers he had from Europe and China. The Spanish midfielder was the great idol of his youth.

Alireza Beiranvand – From sleeping rough to the World Cup with Iran
Alireza Beiranvand was a shepherd in the mountainous region of Lorestan, in the northwest of the country. “My father didn’t like football at all and asked me to work,” Alireza told the Guardian. “He even tore my clothes and gloves and I played with bare hands several times.” He used all his money for a trip to Tehran, where he slept in the in the streets at the beginning. He had several jobs to supplement his income, including working at a car wash where, at 1,93m (6ft 4in) tall, he specialised in cleaning SUVs. He also worked in a dressmaking factory and a pizza shop before making his breakthrough in football. The 25-year-old plays now for Tehran-based club Persepolis.

Playing as a kid “Dal Paran”, a game that involves throwing stones long distances, enabled him to throw the ball much further than many other goalkeepers. His 70-meter assist in the Iranian football league caught the eyes of foreign media and made him famous abroad in 2014. In 2015 Alireza finally became Iran’s first-choice goalkeeper and, with 12 clean sheets in qualifying, he helped Team Melli, as Iran’s team is called at home, cruise to Russia 2018. “I suffered many difficulties to make my dreams come true but I have no intention of forgetting them because they made me the person I am now,” he said.

Carlos Queiroz – Iran’s Portuguese coach
Carlos Queiroz, former trainer at Real Madrid and assistant trainer at Manchester United under Sir Alex Ferguson, […] had worked wonders to get Iran to Brazil. Iran was Asia’s seventh-ranked team when he took over in 2011 and 54th in the world. Within three years Iran was the first ranked team in Asia. For Russia 2018, Iran didn’t lose a single one of their ten games in qualifying and conceded only twice. Sanctions have bit hard:

“We struggle to travel, to have training camps, to bring opponents, to buy equipment. Even buying shirts is a challenge, but these challenges helped me fall in love with Iran. These difficulties become a source of inspiration to the people, it makes them more united, to fight for their country. These boys deserve a smile from the rest of the world.”

Sanctions also meant Nike pulled out of their deal to supply the Iran team with boots one week ahead of the World Cup, forcing players to play with unfamiliar equipment.

“My message for international football is very simple: let us play. Our players deserve that opportunity. Don’t let sanctions create this stigma. Don’t let this go against the spirit of the game. We have football players who love the game”.

“[…] I’ve never, in all my career, seen players deliver so much after receiving so little as I have with these Iran Boys“.

“Tell me one national team which goes to the World Cup without enough friendly games [Greece recently cancelled a friendly, Kosovo then also declined to step in], or by using a 60-metre training pitch?”

Queiroz didn’t expect to be in charge of Iran for seven years. “Football has given me the privilege to go to many places in the world, to see the United States, Japan, Africa or Europe,” he says. “And people ask me about Iran because they’re curious. I tell them that I see exactly the same as in any other country I’ve been to – people who laugh and cry, who dance, who sing. You see mums carrying their kids to school in the morning. You see people complaining about the traffic. Football teaches you how much human beings have in common that have nothing to do with any politics or regimes.”

Football is huge in Iran – the national team regularly drew sell-out crowds of 78,000 in qualifying. “Iran is a football country,” says Queiroz. “Football is in the DNA of the people. Iran is not a fake football country, one which needs to create or imagine fantasy solutions to promote the game. But our players need support and the politics should be left out of the game.” And his young players in Russia? “They have a right to enjoy Russia, to have fun,” he says. “They’ve earned it.”

List of players called up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup (jersey number in parentheses):
Goalkeepers: Ali Beiravand (1), Rashid Mazaheri (12), Amir Abedzadeh (22)
Defenders: Ehsan Hajsafi (3), Rouzbeh Cheshmi (4), Milad Mohammadi (5), Morteza Pouraliganji (8), Mohammad Reza Khanzadeh (13), Pejman Montazeri (15), Majid Hosseini (19), Ramin Rezaeian (23)
Midfielders: Mehdi Torabi (2), Saeid Ezatolahi (6), Masoud Shojaei (7), Omid Ebrahimi (9), Vahid Amiri (11)
Forwards: Karim Ansarifard (10), Saman Ghoddos (14), Reza Ghoochannejhad (16), Mehdi Taremi (17), Alireza Jahanbakhsh (18), Sardar Azmoun (20), Ashkan Dejagah (21)
Head coach: Carlos Queiroz

Sources: MARCA (Original article with contributions by Iranian sports journalist Alireza Moharami. This source was loose translated from Spanish to English), The Guardian, BBC, GQ Magazine, ESPN, FIFA, GOAL, ISNA 1, ISNA 2, ISNA 3, ISNA 4, MEHR, Zimbio, instagram @alirezajb_official, instagram @miladmohammadi.official, instagram @saman.ghoddos, instagram @sardar_azmoun, instagram @rgucci16, instagram @teammellifootball, twitter @FIFAWorldCupIRN

Iran wins bronze at Indoor Hockey World Cup

The Asian Champions won the Bronze Medal match 5:0 against Australia, and became the first non-European team to win a podium position at the Indoor Hockey World Cup, held in Berlin, Germany. Sasan Hatami Nejad won the Best Goalkeeper Award and Reza Norouzzadeh ended as the third highest scorer of the tournament.

Navid Taherirad netted Iran’s opener nearly a quarter into the game; and Reza Norouzzadeh doubled Iran’s lead in the 19th minute. After Hamid Nooranian jabbed the team’s third goal, Norouzzadeh was on target twice again, completing a hat trick in the span of just 21 minutes.

Austria beat Germany 3-2 in the penalty shoot-out and shattered the hosts’ championship hopes, after both teams were tied 3-3 at full time. The Netherlands were the reigning champions, but did not qualify to defend their title.

Ranked currently 7th in the world, Iran lost one match (the semi final against Germany, world number 1), out of a total of 8 matches played at the event. They drew against Austria (world number 2 and Indoor Hockey World Cup 2018 Champions), won against Russia (world number 4), and against Czech Republic (world number 6).

Iranian squad
Behdad Biranvand, Yaghoub Bahrami, Abbas Aruei, Amir Aruei, Hamid Nouraniyan, Alireza Chezani Sharahi, Behnam Fardi, Mohsen Bohlouli, Mohammad Asnaashari, Reza Norouzzadeh, Sasan Hataminejad and Navid Taherirad. Head coach: Esfandiar Safaei

Sources: Payvand News of Iran, International Hockey Federation, Asian Hockey Federation, Wikipedia

Photo Series: Autumn in Iran

Sources: ISNA I, ISNA II, ISNA III, IRNA I, IRNA II, IRNA III, Tasnim News Agency (TNA) I, TNA II, TNA III, TNA IV, TNA V, TNA VI, TNA VII, TNA VIII, TNA IX, Azad News Agency, Mehr News Agency (MNA) I, MNA II, MNA III, MNA IV, MNA V, asangardi.com, Fars News Agency

Iranian illustrator Hoda Hadadi wins gold at the Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards

Hoda Haddadi won the award for her illustrations for Drummer Girl, a book written by Pakistani-Canadian author Hiba Masood and published by Daybreak Press in the United States. The Moonbeam Children’s Book Awards are designed to bring increased recognition to exemplary children’s books and their creators, and to support childhood literacy and life-long reading. The contest is open to authors, illustrators, and publishers of children’s books written in English or Spanish for the North American market.

About Hoda Hadadi
Hadadi is an Iranian illustrator, poet and writer born in February 1977 in Tehran. She graduated with a M.A. in Graphic Design from Art University, Tehran. She teaches at the Association of Iranian Illustrators.

In 1998 Hoda Hadadi started writing and publishing her illustrations for magazines. Her first book as an illustrator was published in 1999 and her first book as a writer (My cloudy day -Shab Aviz) was published in 2000. Since then, she has illustrated more than fifty books published in Iran and around the world; in English i.e. Deep in the Sahara (Penguin Random House, 2013), Drummer Girl (Daybreak Press, 2016), A Rainbow in My Pocket (Tiny Owl, 2016) and forthcoming Just like me! (Tiny Owl, 2017).

Hadadi creates unique collages, balancing delicate materials and textures; she layers gauze papers, stitches, pencil and paint to create beautiful images. Depending on the text they take a more abstract or descriptive form. A Rainbow in My pocket, e.g., was a poem and required a more conceptual style.

In 2003 she directed and animated How is a good girl?, a 4-minute animation. The UNESCO calendar printed her art work in 2004. She has hold more than ten group exhibitions in Iran, India, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Russia, along solo exhibitions in Belgrade, Serbia (2009) and in Tehran (2007).

Other awards
New Horizons of Bologna (2010, Italy)
3rd Prize Teatrio Festival (2008, Italy)
Noma Encouragement Prize (2002 & 2008, Japan)
Defa-e Moghaddas Special Prize (2008, Tehran, Iran)
Grand Prix of Belgrade (2007, Serbia)
Golden Plaque of BIB (2007, Biennial of Illustration Bratislava, Slovakia)
1st Prize of Kanoon Book Festival (2005, Tehran, Iran)
2nd Prize KATHA (2005, India)

Sources: Moonbean Awards, Tehran Times, Tiny Owl Children’s Book Publisher, Wonderland Illustration Group, Saatchi Art, Facebook @hodihadadi, Twitter @hoda_hadadi, Instagram @ludlowgallery