Tag Archives: Science Competitions

Winners at RoboCup IranOpen 2016 (Photos)

The 11th edition of RoboCup IranOpen took place at Tehran International Fairground. Around 2000 university and high school students from different countries competed in three categories including humanoids, flying robots and rescuers, divided into different leagues and difficulty levels. A total of 320 teams, 306 from Iran and 14 teams from abroad (Afghanistan, Canada, China, Germany, the Netherlands, Peru, South Korea, United Kingdom and the USA), competed at this event.

The IranOpen has been organized by the Iranian RoboCup National Committee and Qazvin Azad University. The Committee was officially formed in July 2006 with the objective of promoting robotics and artificial intelligence research.

Winners RoboCup Soccer – 2D Simulation League
1st – Nexus 2D (Ferdowsi University Mashhad, Iran)
2nd – Miracle 2016 (Hefei Normal University, China)
3rd – MT2016 (Hefei University, China)
Technical challenge: Shiraz (Shiraz, Iran)

Winners RoboCup Soccer – 3D Simulation League
1st – UTAustinVilla (University of Texas at Austin, USA)
2nd – Apollo3D (Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China)
3rd – Kylinsky3D (Hohai University Wentian College, China)

Winners RoboCup Soccer – Small Size Robot League
1st – Immortals (Robotics Engineering Center, University of Tehran)
2nd – MRL (Azad University of Qazvin, Iran)
3rd – ZJUNLict (Zhejiang University, China)
Small Size robot soccer (or F180) focuses on the problem of intelligent multi-agent cooperation and control in a highly dynamic environment with a hybrid centralized/distributed system.

Winners RoboCup Soccer – Humanoid League (Adult, teen and kid size)
Adult: 1st – Baset Adult-Size (Baset Pazhuh Tehran Co, Iran)
Teen: 1st – AUTMan Teen (Amirkabir University, Iran / University of Manitoba, Canada)
Kid Size
1st – Bold Hearts (University of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom)
2nd – Parand Kid-Size (Azad University of Parand, Iran)
3rd – FUmanoids (Freie Universität Berlin, Germany)

Winners RoboCup Soccer – Standard Platform League
1st – Nao Team HTWK (HTWK Leipzig, Germany)
2nd – DAlnamite (TU Berlin / DAI-Labor, Germany)
Innovation challenge: MRL-SPL (Azad University of Qazvin, Iran)
The RoboCup Standard Platform League is a RoboCup robot soccer league, in which all teams compete with identical robots.

Winners RoboCup Rescue – Rescue Agent Simulation League
1st MRL (Azad University of Qazvin, Iran)
2nd S.O.S (Amirkabir University of Technology Tehran, Iran)
3rd Poseidon (Farzanegan High School Tehran, Iran)
Technical challenge: RAS-ROSHD (Roshd High School Tehran, Iran)

Winners RoboCup Rescue – Rescue Robot League
1st – MRL (Azad University of Qazvin, Iran)
2nd – YRA (Azad University of Yazd, Iran)
3rd – VRU (Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan, Iran)
Skill, discovery and mobility challenge: MRL
Flying rescue challenge: YRA

Winners RoboCup@Work
1st – ACE IAUK (Azad University of Kerman, Iran)
2nd – MEC (Shariati Technical College Tehran, Iran)

Winners RoboCup Junior – Soccer Open
1st – Helli Afra (Allameh Helli High School 10, Tehran, Iran)
2nd – AMOS (Salam Zeynoddin High School, Iran)
3rd – Allameh Tabatabaei (Allameh Tabatabaei High School)

Winners IranOpenDeminer – Tele-Operated Deminer Robots
1st – YRA (Azad University of Yazd, Iran)
2nd – Pasargad (Amirkabir University of Technology, Iran)
3rd (joint) – SRC (Azad University of Tabriz, Iran) and Malayer University (Malayer University, Hamedan, Iran)

Winners IranOpenDeminer – Small Size Intelligent Deminer Robots
1st – khayyam Robotic (Azad University of Neyshabur, Iran)
2nd – ROBOSINA (Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran)
3rd – RTL (Azad University of Arak, Iran)

Winners IranOpenUAV
1st (joint) – MRL (Azad University of Qazvin, Iran) and KN2C (K.N.Toosi University Tehran, Iran)
3rd – Cyrus UAV (Azad University of Kermanshah, Iran)

Winners IranOpenROV
1st – MRL (Azad University of Qazvin, Iran)
2nd – anZan Of Persian Gulf (Applied Science University of Ahvaz, Iran)

Related articles: The other Iran | Robocup

Video: Mehr News Agency | RoboCup IranOpen 2016

Sources: 2016 IranOpen; Mehr News Agency (MNA) 1; MNA 2; BORNA News; Fars News; IRNA 1; IRNA 2; ISNA 1; ISNA 2 (in Persian); Jam-e Jam Online 1; Jam-e Jam Online 2; dai-labor.de; Baltimore Sun; Epoch Times (in Persian); Facebook | DAI-Labor

Photos: Spaghetti bridge competition in Tehran

The 3rd National Spaghetti Bridge Competition, organized by SBC, was held at Tehran’s Milad Tower. 670 students in 108 teams participated at the event.

A spaghetti bridge is a small scale model bridge made of spaghetti or other hard, dry, straight noodles. The aim is usually to construct a bridge with a specific quantity of materials over a specific span, that can sustain a load. In heavyweight competitions, the bridge that can hold the greatest load for a short period of time wins the contest.

Iranian civil engineering students ranked second in 2004 (load held: 19.17kg) and 2010 (load held: 184.3kg / 406.31lbs) at the Heavyweight Contest organized by Okanagan College in British Columbia, Canada. This competition, that started in 1983, is open to contestants around the world, however the rules state that contestants must be full-time secondary or post-secondary students.

Sources: Wikipedia | Spaghetti bridge, IRNA, Okanagan College 1, Okanagan College 2 (pdf), Azad News Agency, SBC (in Persian)

Iranian high school students win first place in the 9th International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics (IOAA)

Iranian high school students are in this year’s 9th International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics (IOAA) on top of the medal table with three gold, four silver and three bronze medals.

This year’s competition was held from July 26 to August 4 in the Indonesian city of Semarang with the participation of 41 countries. The IOAA is an annual international astronomy competition for high school students and was first held in Thailand in 2007

Arman Vasigh Zadeh Ansari, Fatemeh Zargar Bashi and Ali Zare won the gold medals, Saeed Hojjati Nejad, Saeed Morteza Sadat, Mohammad Hadi Sotoudeh and Ali-Reza Arjmand Shakouri won the silver medals and Ali Chegini, Parsa Nourozi and Seyed Ali Hadian Emrai won the bronze medals.

Special awards were also given to Fatemeh Zargar Bashi (Most Creative Solution) and to Ali Zare (Best Theory).

Related posts (other international successes): The other Iran | Education

Sources: Payvand News of Iran, IOAA 2015 Newsletter Vol.08 | Student rankings (p6), Special Awards and Honorable Mentions (p7), Medal distribution (p8) – (PDF), Facebook | IOAA 2015, IOAA 2015 | Photos

 

Iran puts on remarkable show at RoboCup 2015 in China

The 19th RoboCup Tournament took place from July 19th to July 23rd, 2015 in Hefei City, East China with more than 2000 participants from 47 countries. The Iranian teams achieved three first places, three second places and two third places along with top spots at technical challenges and other awards.

Many Iranian High Schools participated at the event. At the 2D Simulation RoboCup Soccer Competition, Phonix from Atomic Energy High School was awarded Best New Team, finishing 10th. At the same competition HERMES from Allameh Helli Highschool was 5th and Genius2015 from Ghazal High School, Shiraz was 11th.

Detailed results for top Iranian teams

1) RoboCup Rescue Competition
Rescue Simulation: 1st S.O.S (Amirkabir University of Technology, Iran), 2nd MRL (Mechatronic Research Lab, Islamic Azad University of Qazvin, Iran), 3rd SEU_Jolly (China)

Rescue Robot: 1st MRL (Iran), 2nd iRAP_Junior (Thailand), 3rd YRA (Islamic Azad University of Yazd, Iran) // Innovative User Interface Award: Hector Darmstadt (Germany) and MRL (Iran).

2) RoboCup Soccer Competition
Humanoid League – Adult Size: 1st THORwIn (USA), 2nd Baset Adult-Size (Baset Pazhuh Tehran Cooperation, Iran), 3rd HuroEvolution AD (Taiwan) // Technical challenges: 1st Baset Adult-Size (Iran), 2nd HuroEvolution AD (Taiwan) and CIT Brains Adult (Japan), 3rd THORwIn (USA)

Humanoid League – Teen Size: 1st Team Parand (Parand Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran), 2nd HuroEvolution TN (Taiwan), 3rd AUT-UofM (Amirkabir University of Technology – University of Manitoba, Iran – Canada) // Technical challenges: 1st HuroEvolution TN (Taiwan), 2nd place shared between WF Wolves & Taura Bots Teen (Germany & Brazil) and AUT-UofM (Iran & Canada)

Small Size: 1st CMDragons, Carnegie Mellon University (USA), 2nd MRL, Qazvin Islamic Azad University (Iran), 3rd ZJUNlict, Zhejiang University (China) // Technical challenges: 1st ER-Force (Germany), 2nd ZJUNlict (China), 3rd MRL (Iran)

Middle Size: 1st Water (China), 2nd TechUnited Eindhoven (Netherlands), 3rd ARES (China) // Technical challenges: 1st MRL (Iran), 2nd NuBot (China), 3rd Tech United Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2D Simulation: 1st WrightEagle, University of Science and Technology of China (China), 2nd HELIOS2015, Fukuoka University, Osaka Prefecture University, (Japan), 3rd Gliders2015, University of Sydney and CSIRO (Australia) // Best New Team: Phonix (Atomic Energy High School, Iran).

About RoboCup
RoboCup is an annual international robotics competition aiming to promote robotics and artificial intelligence research, by offering a publicly appealing, but formidable challenge. The name RoboCup is a contraction of the competition’s full name, “Robot Soccer World Cup”, but there are many other stages of the competition such as “RoboCupRescue”, “RoboCup@Home” and “RoboCupJunior”. The official goal of the project is “By the middle of the 21st century, a team of fully autonomous humanoid robot soccer players shall win a soccer game, complying with the official rules of FIFA, against the winner of the most recent World Cup.”

Other related articles: The other Iran | RoboCup

Sources: RoboCup 2015 | Results, Mehr News Agency | News 1, Wikipedia | RoboCup, Mehr News Agency | Photos, RoboCup Humanoid League, Mehr News Agency | News 2

Sahar Pakseresht: Young Iranian woman wins the ‘The Young Innovators Competition’ of the International Telecom Union

The Young Innovators Competition has many challenges includes ‘Local Digital Content’, ‘Open Source Technologies for Disaster Management’ and ‘Smart Cities and Climate Change’.

Sahar Pakseresht was one of the participants of ‘Open Source Technologies for Disaster Management’ challenge.Her idea, called ‘NAJI’ has been selected as the winner of this challenge among almost 150 applications from a group of dedicated, exciting and motived young people from all over the world.

Sahar Pakseresht Young Iranian woman wins the ‘The Young Innovators Competition’ of the International Telecom UnionSo, What is ‘NAJI’? Naji (means savior in Persian) is a two part system, consisting of a bracelet that marks the user’s location and vital signs in a disaster, making rescue easier and a mobile application which streamlines requests for assistance from emergency personnel. It functions over a range of communication systems in order to make sure that it continues to function when needed, by switching from data to phone to SMS to USSD as needed.

What does NAJI do in details?

She says: “I faced the earthquake when I was 15 years old. It was the most horrible things in my life, I saw myself too close to death. I was wonder how to overcome to this fear and save lives of human with the help of technology.” Sahar wrote, “If I can save the life of one person then my mission is done successfully. Once I heard about this competition I found out that this competition is the way that I was always looking for to reach my goals.”

Source: techly.co – An Iranian girl is a winner of ITU Telecom World 2014

Iranian Mathematician Maryam Mirzakhani: The first woman to win the “Nobel Prize of Mathematics”

Maryam Mirzakhani

Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to ever win the Fields Medal – known as the “Nobel Prize of mathematics” – in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of the symmetry of curved surfaces. […]

Mirzakhani was born and raised in Tehran, Iran. As a young girl she dreamed of becoming a writer. By high school, however, her affinity for solving mathematical problems and working on proofs had shifted her sights. […]

She became known to the international math scene as a teenager, winning gold medals at both the 1994 and 1995 International Math Olympiads – she finished with a perfect score in the latter competition. Mathematicians who would later be her mentors and colleagues followed the mathematical proofs she developed as an undergraduate.

After earning her bachelor’s degree from Sharif University of Technology in 1999, she began work on her doctorate at Harvard University under the guidance of Fields Medal recipient Curtis McMullen. […] —By Bjorn Carey for Stanford University

Interesting Interview with Mirzakhani by The Guardian:

G: What are some of your earliest memories of mathematics?

I grew up in a family with three siblings. My parents were always very supportive and encouraging. It was important for them that we have meaningful and satisfying professions …

In many ways, it was a great environment for me, though these were hard times during the Iran-Iraq war. My older brother was the person who got me interested in science in general. He used to tell me what he learned in school. My first memory of mathematics is probably the time that he told me about the problem of adding numbers from 1 to 100. I think he had read in a popular science journal how Gauss solved this problem. The solution was quite fascinating for me.

G: What experiences and people were especially influential on your mathematical education?

I was very lucky in many ways. The war ended when I finished elementary school; I couldn’t have had the great opportunities that I had if I had been born 10 years earlier. I went to a great high school in Tehran – Farzanegan – and had very good teachers. I met my friend Roya Beheshti during the first week of middle school. It is invaluable to have a friend who shares your interests, and it helps you stay motivated.

Our school was close to a street full of bookstores in Tehran. I remember how walking along this crowded street, and going to the bookstores, was so exciting for us. We couldn’t skim through the books like people usually do here in a bookstore, so we would end up buying a lot of random books. Also, our school principal was a strong-willed woman who was willing to go a long way to provide us with the same opportunities as the boys’ school.

Later, I got involved in Math Olympiads that made me think about harder problems. As a teenager, I enjoyed the challenge. But most importantly, I met many inspiring mathematicians and friends at Sharif University. The more I spent time on mathematics, the more excited I became.

G: Could you comment on the differences between mathematical education in Iran and in the US?

It is hard for me to comment on this question since my experience here in the US is limited to a few universities, and I know very little about the high school education here. However, I should say that the education system in Iran is not the way people might imagine here. As a graduate student at Harvard, I had to explain quite a few times that I was allowed to attend a university as a woman in Iran. While it is true that boys and girls go to separate schools up to high school, this does not prevent them from participating say in the Olympiads or the summer camps. […]

G: What advice would you give those who would like to know more about mathematics – what it is, what its role in society has been, and so son?

This is a difficult question. I don’t think that everyone should become a mathematician, but I do believe that many students don’t give mathematics a real chance. I did poorly in math for a couple of years in middle school; I was just not interested in thinking about it. I can see that without being excited mathematics can look pointless and cold. The beauty of mathematics only shows itself to more patient followers.
Source: The Guardian

Excerpts of an article by Erica Klarreich published in Quanta Magazine that shows some other interesting aspects about her personality:

With her low voice and steady, gray-blue eyes, Mirzakhani projects an unwavering self-confidence. She has an equal tendency, however, toward humility. Asked to describe her contribution to a particular research problem, she laughed, hesitated and finally said: “To be honest, I don’t think I’ve had a very huge contribution.” And when an email arrived in February saying that she would receive what is widely regarded as the highest honor in mathematics — the Fields Medal, which will be awarded today at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Seoul, South Korea — she assumed that the account from which the email was sent had been hacked.

Other mathematicians, however, describe Mirzakhani’s work in glowing terms. […]

As a child growing up in Tehran, Mirzakhani had no intention of becoming a mathematician. Her chief goal was simply to read every book she could find. She also watched television biographies of famous women such as Marie Curie and Helen Keller, and later read “Lust for Life,” a novel about Vincent van Gogh. These stories instilled in her an undefined ambition to do something great with her life — become a writer, perhaps. […]

In her first week at the new school, she made a lifelong friend, Roya Beheshti, who is now a mathematics professor at Washington University in St. Louis. As children, the two explored the bookstores that lined the crowded commercial street near their school. Browsing was discouraged, so they randomly chose books to buy. “Now, it sounds very strange,” Mirzakhani said. “But books were very cheap, so we would just buy them.”

To her dismay, Mirzakhani did poorly in her mathematics class that year. Her math teacher didn’t think she was particularly talented, which undermined her confidence. At that age, “it’s so important what others see in you,” Mirzakhani said. “I lost my interest in math.”

The following year, Mirzakhani had a more encouraging teacher, however, and her performance improved enormously. “Starting from the second year, she was a star,” Beheshti said. […]

In 1994, when Mirzakhani was 17, she and Beheshti made the Iranian math Olympiad team. Mirzakhani’s score on the Olympiad test earned her a gold medal. The following year, she returned and achieved a perfect score. […]

After completing an undergraduate degree in mathematics at Sharif University in Tehran in 1999, Mirzakhani went to graduate school at Harvard University, where she started attending McMullen’s seminar. […]

She started going to McMullen’s office and peppering him with questions, scribbling down notes in Farsi.

“She had a sort of daring imagination,” recalled McMullen, a 1998 Fields medalist. “She would formulate in her mind an imaginary picture of what must be going on, then come to my office and describe it. At the end, she would turn to me and say, ‘Is it right?’ I was always very flattered that she thought I would know.”
Read on here: Quanta Magazine

Other interesting articles on Mirzakhani in iranianroots.com:
http://iranianroots.com/?s=Mirzakhani

Iranian female and men students win several medals at International Mathematics Competition 2014

Tehran’s Sharif University of Technology students won two gold and four bronze medals at the 21st International Mathematics Competition for University Students.

73 teams from around the world participated in the competition held in Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria, from July 29 to August 4.

Mina Dalir-Rouyfard and Pedram Safayei gwere awarded gold medals and Mojtaba Tefaq, Mahed Abroshan, Morteza Soltanipour and Mohammad Hassan Gol-Mohammadian earned bronze medals.

The competition consisted of two sessions of five hours each. Problems were posed from the fields of algebra, analysis (real and complex), geometry and combinatorics. The working language was English.

http://www.payvand.com/news/14/aug/1036.html

Related articles about Iran’s performance in science competitions: https://theotheriran.com/tag/science-competitions/