Tag Archives: Kerman Province

Autumn snow in northern and central Iran (Photos)

Sources: IRNA 1, IRNA 2, ISNA 1, ISNA 2, ISNA 3, ISNA 4, Mehr News Agency (MNA 1), MNA 2, MNA 3, MNA 4, MNA 5, MNA 6, Tasnim News Agency (TNA) 1, TNA 2, TNA 3, TNA 4, TNA 5, Young Journalists Club

Photo series: Winter in Iran – First spring signs

Nowruz, the Iranian New Year celebrated on the day of the spring equinox in the northern hemisphere, has almost arrived and with it we can enjoy the first blossoms across the country: From Rumeshgan in Lorestan, Estur in Kerman, Khaledah and Shiraz in Fars to the gardens of Qazvin.

Sources: Mehr News Agency (MNA) 1, MNA 2, MNA 3, MNA 4, Tasnim News Agency, ISNA, IRNA, Jamejam Online

Iran’s Kerman Province: Fath-Abad Garden (Photos)

Fath-Abad Garden is located next to the village of Ekhteyarabad, 25km from the city of Kerman. It dates back to the Qajar era. The garden has been recently renovated after having its last restoration in 1972.

Shazdeh Garden, a historical  Persian Garden near Mahan, also in Kerman Province, has been modeled on Fathabad Garden.

Related articles: The other Iran | Shazdeh Garden

Sources: IRNA | Photos, Wikipedia | Fath-Abad Garden (in Persian), Tasnim | Photos , ISNA | Photos

Iran’s Kerman Province: Rageh Canyon (Photos)

The Rageh canyon is one of the unique and beautiful natural places, in the desert of Rafsanjan County. It was created by the floods and soil erosion of the Givdary River over twenty thousand years. This 20km long, 70m deep and 180m wide valley, with sharp conical peaks, blades and strip wise walls, has interesting and various spatial shapes, narrow and wide passages alongside the river and valley walls.

The nearest city to Rageh Canyon is Rafsanjan, the capital of Rafsanjan County. It is Iran’s center of pistachio cultivation and also a major center of carpet production even though the rugs are sold as Kermani rugs rather than Rafsanjani ones. Another large employer is the nearby Sarcheshmeh copper mines.

Sources: Wikipedia | Rafsanjan (in English), other sources in Persian: ISNA | Photos, Mehr News Agency | Photos, Mehr News Agency | News, rageh.ir.

Iran’s Kerman Province: Mahan – Shazdeh Garden (Photos) – Part 2

Shazdeh Garden is a historical Persian garden located 6km away from the city of Mahan in Kerman province, Iran. It is a rectangular green oasis surrounded by brown desert and a good example of Persians gardens that take advantage of suitable natural climate.

Related article with more information and photos:
The other Iran | Iran’s Kerman Province: Mahan – Shazdeh Garden

Sources: Jamejam Online | Photos, Tishineh | Shazdeh Garden, NEX1 TV | Photos

Photo series: Winter in Iran – Snowfall in Kerman

Kerman is the capital city of Kerman Province, Iran. At the 2011 census, its population was 821,374, making it the 10th most populous city of Iran.

Iran, Kerman mapIt is one of the largest cities of Iran in terms of area. Kerman is famous for its long history and strong cultural heritage. The city is home to many historic mosques and Zoroastrian fire temples. Kerman is also on the list of the recent world’s 1000 cleanest cities. Kerman is also a former capital of Iran, a position that it held during several periods. It is located on a large, flat plain, 1,036 km (643 mi) south of Tehran, the capital of Iran.

Sources: ISNA | PhotosWikipedia | Kerman

Kerman holds biggest Zoroastrian Sadeh Festival

The Zoroastrians marked Sadeh, an ancient feast celebrating the creation of fire, in Kerman. Sadeh has been observed since the days when Zoroastrianism was the dominant religion in the powerful Persian empire.

Every year, on January 30th, thousands of Zoroastrians or even the Muslims from all over Iran as well as other countries gather in Kerman, the city with the greatest Zoroastrian population, to celebrate the religious feast of Jashn-e Sadeh by burning firewood in an open space to signify the coming of spring and to defeat the forces of darkness, frost and cold.

Sadeh celebrates 50 days before Nowrouz, the Persian New Year. Sadeh (meaning ‘hundred’ in Persian) is a mid-winter festival that refers to one hundred days and nights past the end of summer.

Mohammad Ali Golabzadeh, researcher and expert on Kerman, told Mehr News that the ceremony is still celebrated like the ancient times in Kerman, Yazd, and some other Iranian cities.

“Although Sadeh is attributed to Zoroastrians, the ceremony itself has its roots in Kerman’s rituals and even the Muslims participate in it,” he said, adding that for the majority of Iranians Sadeh had no religious significance and everyone gathered to have a good time and celebrate the precious things God has granted humanity.

Source: Payvand News of Iran