Tag Archives: Kermanshah Province

Iran’s Kermanshah Province: Paveh – Pomegranate Harvest

Paveh, with a population of 19,800 inhabitants, is a city in Kermanshah Province, Iran. It is located in a sub-region along the Iran-Iraq border commonly referred to as Hewraman situated within the larger geographical region of Kurdistan. The city is considered by inhabitants of the region as the capital of the Hewraman. The inhabitants of Paveh are mostly Kurds that speak Auramani.

As a mountainous town, Paveh has cold winters and cool springs. The surrounding mountains are normally filled with fresh spring water from March to June. The town is also encircled with large fruit gardens which create beautiful sceneries during summers.

An old myth regarding the name of the city is that the Emperor Yazdgerd III sent his son named Pav to this area to renew his religious Zoroastrian faith. Both Persians and the local Kurdish inhabitants practiced Zoroastrianism during the Persian Empire’s Sasanian era from which this myth is derived.

Sources: ISNA, Wikipedia | Paweh

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Iran’s Kermanshah Province: Kambadn

Kambadn was an ancient city, located north of ancient Kermanshah. Nowadays, with the expansion of the city the ruins are located between Taq Bostan and Kermanshah. A city named Kambadn was mentioned in Bisutun (Behistun), the inscriptions authored by Darius the Great, and archeological excavations have located this city near Taq Bostan.

Kermanshah is considered one of the cradles of prehistoric cultures. The area has been occupied by prehistoric people since the Lower Paleolithic period, and continued to later Paleolithic periods till late Pleistocene period; with Neanderthal presence in Middle Paleolithic. The region was also one of the first places in which human settlements were established between 8,000-10,000 years ago.

In May 2009 one of the oldest prehistorian village in the Middle East dating back to 9800 BCE, was discovered in Sahneh, located west of Kermanshah. Remains of later village occupations and early Bronze Age are found in a number of mound sites in the city itself.

In ancient Iranian mythology, the construction of the city is attributed to Tahmuras, the third king of Pishdadian dynasty. It is believed that the Sassanids have constructed Kermanshah and Bahram IV – he was called Kermanshah, meaning king of Kerman – gave his name to the city.

Source: IRNA, Wikipedia | Kambadn (Persian), Wikipedia | Kermanshah, amitisiran.blogfa.com

Photo Series: Spring in Iran – Paveh, Kermanshah Province

Kermanshah, Iran – Paveh MapPaveh is the capital of Paveh County in Kermanshah Province, Iran. At the 2011 census its population was 23.704 inhabitants.

Paveh is located in the west of Iran, 112km from Kermanshah. It lies in a sub-region along the Iran-Iraq border commonly referred to as Hewraman situated within the larger geographical region of Kurdistan. The city is considered by inhabitants of the region as the capital of the Hewraman. The inhabitants of Paveh are mostly Kurds that speak Auramani.

As a mountainous town, Paveh has cold winters and cool springs. The surrounding mountains are normally filled with fresh spring water from March to June. The town is also encircled with large fruit gardens which create beautiful sceneries during summers.

An old myth regarding the name of the city is that the Emperor Yazdgerd III sent his son named Pav to this area to renew his religious Zoroastrian faith. Both Persians and the local Kurdish inhabitants practiced Zoroastrianism during the Persian Empire’s Sasanian era from which this myth is derived.

Sources: Wikipedia | Paweh, Mehr News Agency | Photos

Photo series: Winter in Iran – Snow in Bisutun, Kermanshah Province

Please also check out the amazing story and photos of the Bisutun Inscription – the Iranian Rosetta Stone, that was vandalized by Allied soldiers during the Anglo-Russian invasion of Iran.

Sources: Tasnim News | Photos, The other Iran