Author Archives: radioyaran

About radioyaran

We are two brothers, trying to collect the most interesting excerpts of new articles published mostly in well-known mainstream media. Some times we also pick text snippets from well-known blogs. In our oppinion most articles contain a lot of repetitive and not really relevant text or they are just too long. Our Aim is to reduce interesting articles to their most relevant parts and offer the link to the original article(s). Apart from the subject line the posts do not contain personal opinion, but consist of citations of the original articles. We are secular, against racism, sectarianism and interference in other countries internal conflicts, because it is seldom really well minded, and it mostly worsens the conflict. We focus on current politics but we will occasionally post articles that give a better picture of the overall context.

Iran’s president has more cabinet members with Ph.D. degrees from U.S. universities than Barack Obama does

Iran-cabinet members with Ph.D. degrees from U.S. universities

Iran-cabinet members with Ph.D. degrees from U.S. universities

“Take, for example, Rouhani’s chief of staff, Mohammad Nahavandian. He spent many years in the United States and has a Ph.D. in economics from George Washington University. Or Javad Zarif, the foreign affairs minister and chief negotiator in the recent nuclear deal between Iran and six global powers. He studied at the University of San Francisco and completed his doctorate at the University of Denver. For five years, he lived in New York and was Iran’s ambassador to the United Nations. Ali Akbar Salehi, head of Iran’s Atomic Energy Organization, has a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from MIT. Mahmoud Vaezi, the communication minister, studied electrical engineering at Sacramento and San Jose State Universities and was enrolled in the Ph.D. program at Louisiana State University (he ultimately earned a doctorate in international relations at Warsaw University).  Other cabinet members have advanced degrees from universities in Europe and Iran. Abbas Ahmad Akhoundi, the transportation minister, has a Ph.D. from the University of London, while President Rouhani got his from Glasgow Caledonian University in Scotland. The new government in Tehran, in other words, might well be one of the most technocratic in the world.”

Source: The Atlantic | The Case for Giving Iran’s Scholar-Diplomats a Chance

Other surprising articles regarding Iran and the US: The other Iran | Tag | USA

Yazd, one of the oldest cities of the world

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yazd

Yazd (About this sound pronunciation (help·info) [jæzd]; Persian: یزد‎)[1] is the capital of Yazd Province, Iran, and a centre of Zoroastrian culture. The city is located 270 km (170 mi) southeast of Isfahan.”

“The city has a history of over 3,000 years, dating back to the time of the Median empire, when it was known as Ysatis (or Issatis)”

RooftopsYazdIran2008_w500 yazd Yazd_C1 Yazd_In_1_frame

Karun-3, a dam in Southern Iran

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karun-3_Dam

“The purpose of the dam is for power generation and flood control. The Karun III power generators are connected to the national power network as the peak power generation. With this power plant being operated, with the capacity of 2,280 MW,[4] and an average annual electric power generation of 4,137 GWh, a major portion of the electric power shortage in the country will be met.”

karun3 karun karun2

Airplane Overhaul Facility in Mashhad, Eastern Iran

Mashhad International Airport is the country’s second busiest airport only to Tehran Mehrabad Airport.

The airport also houses an overhaul facility for light and heavy aircraft where the specialists are engaged in rebuilding and modernizing the air transportation system of the country.

Source: Payvand News of Iran

Researchers at Iran’s Sharif University received a US patent

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Sharif+University+Researchers+Receive+US+Patent+on+Solar+Cells.-a0288713625

“Researchers at Iran’s Sharif University of Technology managed to receive a US patent issued under the title of ‘Single-Sided Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Having A Vertical Patterned Structure’ and publication number of US20110220192.”

““We have proposed a novel structure for the solar cells which can eliminate the unnecessary formation of the conductive glasses–a major cost-intensive byproduct in the course of solar cells manufacturing,” Nima Taqavinia, associate professor at Sharif University of Technology, was quoted”

solar

Ancient Iran in The British Museum

http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/galleries/middle_east/room_52_ancient_iran.aspx

“Iran was a major centre of ancient culture. It was rich in valuable natural resources, especially metals, and played an important role in the development of ancient Middle Eastern civilisation and trade. Room 52 highlights these ancient interconnections and the rise of distinctive local cultures, such as in Luristan, during the age of migrations after about 1400 BC.”

ps295640_m ps207493_m

Financial Times: Iran among top 2014 travel destinations

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/e4f47a04-6972-11e3-89ce-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2plOF8yt7

“Thirty-five years after it dropped off the tourist map, Iran may be set to return to the top of “must-visit” lists for 2014. Its attractions have never been in doubt – from ski resorts to beaches, stunning Islamic architecture, ancient archaeological sites and superb food…”one of the things our clients tell us they enjoy most is the friendliness and welcome provided by the locals.””

iran6 iran iran2 iran3 iran4 iran5

Tara Kamangar, “world-class musician”

http://www.taraartemis.com/#!/biography

“Pianist Tara Kamangar has been praised as a “huge talent” (London Evening Standard) and a “world-class musician who excels at blending the best of Western and Middle-Eastern compositions”

Playing a fine piece:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmH6JxEiIu8

4 tara tara2

Iran Khodro, the largest vehicle manufacturer in the Middle East, Central Asia and North Africa

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran_Khodro

Iran Khodro Company (in Persian: ایران خودرو‎), also known as IKCO, is the leading Iranian vehicle manufacturer, with headquarters in Tehran.[5] The company’s original name was Iran National. IKCO was founded in 1962 and it produced 688,000 passenger cars in 2009.[6] IKCO manufactures vehicles, including Samand, Peugeot and Renault cars, and trucks, minibuses and buses…The company has become the largest vehicle manufacturer in the Middle East, Central Asia and North Africa.”

Also:
http://www.aljazeera.com/video/middleeast/2013/12/iran-auto-industry-sanctions-20131226134241245158.html

“Country wants to be one of top 10 automakers in the world by producing up to 3 million cars a year.”

1367154937_samand_jpg iran-khodro-safir-09 iran-khodro-samand-sarir-photo-363751-s-520x318 iran-khodro-soren-elx-interior-photo-363758-s-520x318

Amir Kabir dam in Karaj (North of Tehran)

Amir Kabir dam, also known as Karaj dam, is a dam in Iran, located 63 kilometres (39 mi) northwest of Tehran and 23 kilometres (14 mi) north of Karaj. Amir kabir Dam was constructed on the Karaj River, and was the first multi-purpose dam in Iran.
Ref: Wikipedia

Maysam Ghovanloo develops system to control wheelchair with tongue

http://www.payvand.com/news/12/feb/1244.html

Maysam Ghovanloo, an Iranian engineer at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), has developed the “Tongue Drive System” (TDS), a wireless, wearable device that allows the user to operate computers and control electric wheelchairs with movements of the tongue.

See also:
http://www.news.gatech.edu/features/tongue-drive-wheelchair
and
http://www.cis.fiu.edu/photo-gallery/v/SCS-Photos/lectures/Ghovanloo/

“Maysam Ghovanloo received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran, in 1994 and the M.S. degree in biomedical engineering from the Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 1997. He also received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI in 2003 and 2004, respectively. His Ph.D. research was on developing a modular wireless microsystem for Micromachined neural stimulating microprobes…In the summer of 2002, he was with the Advanced Bionics Inc., Sylmar, CA, working on the design and development of spinal-cord stimulators. From 2004 to 2007 he was an assistant professor at the Department of ECE in the North Carolina State University, Raleigh. In June 2007 he joined the faculty of Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, where he is currently an assistant professor at the School of ECE and the founding director of the GT-Bionics laboratory.”

Maysam_Jason_l-res

 

 

Iran at forefront of stem cell research

“Though the world’s attention has focused on Iran’s advancing nuclear program, Iranian scientists have moved to the forefront in embryonic stem cell research, according to a recent joint study by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.”
—Source: The Washington Times

“Thirty years after the toppling of the Shah in Iran, the nation is undergoing another revolution of sorts. Iran is investing heavily in stem cell research, and despite researchers working with limited access to laboratory equipment and resources, the country may emerge as a scientific force to be reckoned with in the stem cell field.”
—Source: The Scientist

index

What Iranians Say Now About the US

“The reactions I received as an American traveling for 10 days in Tehran, Isfahan and Qum mirrored Iran’s politics and posture in this moment — there is a serious, even eager, interest in reconnecting with the West, even as Iranians struggle with three decades of poisoned relations. […]

One important voice in advancing that transformation is Grand Ayatollah Youssef Saanei. […] He endorsed the nuclear deal and said that, “today the people in power in Iran and the people in power in the United States should forgive each other, should forget the past and start the friendship.”

Source: The New York Times | What Iranians Say Now About ‘the Great Satan’ by Carol Giacomo

Nanotechnology in Iran: Well Organised and Impressive

http://www.cientifica.com/nanotechnology-in-iran-well-organised-and-impressive/

“Iran has always been a source of fascination, a place of ancient culture and history and now a country making a lot of noise about science and technology, so I was pleased to be invited by the Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council to attend the Iran Nano 2011 exhibition in Tehran.
As I’d spent the previous few days in Taiwan at the Taiwan Nano 2011 exhibition, it was a good opportunity to contrast the two events and try to judge whether there was any truth to the claims that Iran is becoming a world-class player in nanotechnology.

The unique aspect of Iranian nanotechnology is that because of the various international sanctions over the past thirty years it’s not the kind of place where you can just order an AFM or an electron microscope from a major US or Japanese supplier.”

About the author:
Tim Harper, International Innovation Strategist, Entrepreneur, Emerging Technologies & Keynote Speaker

Also:
“Iran Ranks 9th in Nanotechnology in World”
http://www.nanotech-now.com/news.cgi?story_id=47122

Nanoscience-Tabriz

The Caspian Sea, the worlds largest landlocked lake

Irpedia | The Caspian Coast

“Caspian Sea, the largest landlocked lake in the world, is located in northern Iran. The Iranian Caspian coast including the three littoral provinces of Gilan, Golestan and Mazandaran, with its thick forests and large-scale rice paddies presents a striking contrast to the dry inner plateau of Iran.

A four-hour drive from Tehran, the Caspian is Iran’s Riviera, with a narrow plain of paddyfields and orchards separating the sea from forested mountains where bears and leopards roam around ruined Mongol castles.”

Also: Wikipedia | Caspian Sea

img_0693 189 Iran & Neighbors Map 800px-Caspian_see-Iran-1 1289287626.zfE

Iranian wins gold at World Youth Chess Championship

http://www.payvand.com/news/13/dec/1175.html

Pouya Idani of Iran won the World Youth Chess Championship 2013 held in Al Ain, the United Arab Emirates on Saturday.

Also: “Pouya Idani grabs the trophy in Khazar Open 2012”
http://www.chessdom.com/pouya-idani-grabs-the-trophy-in-khazar-open-2012/

Iranian-chess-player-Pouya-Idani-1

 

Iranian contribution to SUNNI Islam

While anti-Iranian sentiment is present particularly among Sunni Arabs it´s highly interesting that all six authors of the so called canonical “Sahih Hadith” books were Iranians:
http://saeedtalpur.wordpress.com/2013/12/11/six-persian-iranian-imams-sunni-hadith-collectors/

“According to the Cambridge History of Iran: After this period commences the age of the authors of the six canonical collections of Sunni hadith, all of whom were Persian. The authors of the six collections are as follows:

  1. Muhammad b. Isma’il al-Bukhari, the author of the Sahih Bukhari, which he composed over a period of sixteen years. Traditional sources quote Bukhari as saying that he did not record any hadith before performing ablution and praying. Bukhari died near Samarqand in 256/869-70.
  2. Muslim b. Hajjaj al-Naishapuri, who died in Nishapur in 261/ 874-5 and whose Sahih Muslim is second in authenticity only to that of Bukhari.
  3. Abu Dawood Sulaiman b. Ash’ath al-Sijistani, a Persian but of Arab descent, who died in 275/888-9.
  4. Muhammad b. ‘Isa al-Tirmidhi, the author of the well-known as Sunan al-Tirmidhi, who was a student of Bukhari and died in 279/892-3.
  5. Abu ‘Abd al-Rahman al-Nasa’i, who was from Khurasan and died in 303/915-16.
  6. Ibn Majah al-Qazwini, who died in 273/886-7.”

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kutub_al-Sittah

In addition two of the most relevant early islamic historians, Tabari and Baladhuri were Iranians:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_ibn_Jarir_al-Tabari
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baladhuri

Iran from Viewpoint of a Japanese Pianist

“Now, when I go over my memories of that exceptional trip after having stayed in Iran for a few days, I see that the most prominent part of those memories is warm and honest treatment as well as the hospitality of the Iranian people. Everybody there hails you with a polite smile. I, having been born in a country where respectful treatment of others is of high importance, was in a good position to appreciate the respectful treatment of the Iranian people.

What I saw from the Iranian people during my short trip [to that country] was that they are always serene, well-mannered, and ready to offer all kinds of assistance and cooperation. I wondered why I didn’t know anything about the good and well-mannered people of Iran, who are very cultured and take pride in their culture and arts, before this trip?” –Noriko Ogawa

Noriko Ogawa is a Japanese pianist that traveled to Iran on an invitation extended to her by the Japanese Embassy in Tehran. She had musical performances in the cities of Tehran and Shiraz.

Read more at Payvand | Concert in Tehran: Iran from Viewpoint of a Japanese Pianist

The Alborz mountains and Mount Damavand

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alborz

Alborz (About this sound listen (help·info) Persian: البرز‎), also written as Alburz, Elburz or Elborz, is a mountain range in northern Iran stretching from the borders of Azerbaijan and Armenia in the northwest to the southern end of the Caspian Sea, and ending in the east at the borders of Turkmenistan and Afghanistan.[1] The highest mountain in West Asia, Mount Damavand, Amol, Mazandaran is located in the range.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elburz_Range_forest_steppe

“Elevations typically range from 2,000 to 4,000 metres (6,600 to 13,000 ft), and the highest point in the Middle East, 5,610 metres (18,410 ft) high Mount Damavand, is found here. Mount Damavand is also the tallest volcano in Asia and below its summit crater are found fumaroles and hot springs as well as glaciers.”
250px-Damavand3 Alborz

Castles in Iran since pre-islamic times

800px-Falak-ol-Aflak_Castle_07

Falak-ol-Aflak Castle, Lorestan Province, Iran

Falak-ol-Aflak Castle (in Persian: Dez-e Shapur-Khwast and in ancient times known as Dezbar as well as Shapur-Khwast) is a castle situated on the top of a large hill with the same name within the city of Khorramabad, the regional capital of Lorestan Province, Iran. This gigantic structure was built during the Sassanid era (226–651).
Source: Wikipedia | Falak-ol-Aflak Castle

babak

Babak Castle, East Azerbaijan Province, Iran

Papak Fort or Babak Castle (in Azerbaijani Baezz Qalasi), also known as the Immortal Castle or Republic Castle, is a large citadel and National Symbol of Iranians on the top of a mountain in the Arasbaran forests, which is located 6 km southwest of Kaleybar City, East Azerbaijan Province, northwestern Iran.
Source: Wikipedia | Babak Fort

800px-Narin_ghaleh_2

Narin Ghaleh, Yazd Province, Iran

The Narin Qal’eh or Narin Castle is a mud-brick fort or castle in the town of Meybod, Yazd Province, Iran. Structures like these constituted the government stronghold in some of the older (pre-Islamic) towns of central Iran. Some of these castles incorporate mud bricks of the Medes period and of the Achaemenid and Sassanid dynasties.
Source: Wikipedia | Narin Qal’eh

Further links:
1. Payvand | Ardeshir Palace in Kerman
2. The other Iran | Roudkhan Castle
3. Payvand News of Iran | Behestan Rock
4. Wikipedia | List of castles in Iran

Christianity in Iran

“Today, there are at least 600 churches for 250,000 Christians in Iran. A number of Christian denominations are represented in Iran. Many members of the larger, older churches belong to minority ethnic groups – the Assyrians and Armenians – having their own distinctive culture and language…In 1976, the Christian population numbered 168,593 people, mostly Armenians. Due to the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, almost half of the Armenians migrated to the newly independent Republic of Armenia. However, the opposite trend has occurred since 2000, and the number of Christians with Iranian citizenship increased to 109,415 in 2006. At the same time, significant immigration of Assyrians from Iraq has been recorded due to massacres and harassment in post-Saddam Iraq.”

See also: Wikipedia | Armenian-Iranians, Wikipedia | Assyrians in Iran, Wikipedia | Roman Catholicism in Iran

Source: Wikipedia | Christianity in Iran

 

“A Separation”, first Iranian movie to win the Oscar academy award

A Separation (Persian: Jodái-e Náder az Simin, “The Separation of Nader from Simin”) is a 2011 Iranian drama film written and directed by Asghar Farhadi.

Farhadi focuses on a middle class family in Tehran to explore the tensions and challenges of modern Iran. By examining class, religious and gender conflict through the intimate lens of family life, he highlights the interconnection between the personal and political. The lecture identifies and analyses the multiple pressure points within the film narrative and the central idea that the very things that connect us as human beings also separate us.

A Separation won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2012, becoming the first Iranian film to win the award. It received the Golden Bear for Best Film and the Silver Bears for Best Actress and Best Actor at the 61st Berlin International Film Festival, becoming the first Iranian film to win the Golden Bear. It also won the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film.

The film was nominated for the Best Original Screenplay Academy Award, making it the first non-English film in five years to achieve this.

Nader and Simin: A Separation (trailer):

Asghar Farhadi, 123 mins, Iran, 2011

Source: Wikipedia | A Separation, Australian Centre for the Moving Image | A Separation

Iran in the “International Science Ranking” (2012)

http://www.scimagojr.com/countryrank.php?area=0&category=0&region=all&year=2012&order=it&min=0&min_type=it

“According to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), Iran increased its academic publishing output nearly tenfold from 1996 to 2004, and has been ranked first globally in terms of output growth rate (followed by China with a 3 fold increase).”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_and_technology_in_Iran#Contribution_of_Iranians_and_people_of_Iranian_origin_to_modern_science

Iranian scientists to receive UNESCO Award

http://www.payvand.com/news/11/aug/1232.html

Four Iranian scientists ranked in the list of Islamic World’s top scholars are to receive UNESCO Award.

The scientists include Abbas Shafiee Professor of Faculty of Pharmacy of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Mojtaba Shamsipour Professor of Chemistry in Razi University, Mohsen Nemat Gorgani Professor of Biochemistry in Tehran University and Ali Akbar Sabouri Professor of Biophysics of Tehran University.

Burton Richter, an American Nobel laureate in physics at Sharif University in Tehran

” ‘The students here are very impressive,’ Richter said, lauding the high level of education at Sharif. […]

The country’s leaders […] invest heavily in scientific and industrial achievement. […]

Iranian scientists claim breakthroughs in nanotechnology, biological researchers are pushing the boundaries of stem cell research and the country’s car industry produces more cars than anywhere else in the region.”

Source: The Washington Post | Iran Makes the Sciences A Part of Its Revolution by Thomas Erdbrink

Tochal: A ski resort in Irans capital Tehran

http://www.payvand.com/news/10/mar/1025.html

Mount Tochal is a mountain in the Alborz range and adjacent to metropolitan Tehran, Iran. The mountain has a 12 km long ridgeline. The highest peak, also called Mount Tochal, is at an elevation of 3,964 m (13,005 feet)

https://i1.wp.com/payvand.com/blog/files/2011/01/tehran-snow-tochal-04.jpg

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/24/Tochal-Tehran.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/www.damawand.de/Photo/Tochal/Tochal-Alimohamadi.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/www.tochal.org/app_images/gal/large/1793507343.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/www.mountain-forecast.com/system/images/15464/large/Tochal.jpg

Marjan Kalhor: Iranian Alpine Skier

Marjan Kalhor (born July 21st, 1988 in Tehran) is an Iranian alpine skier who became the first Iranian woman to participate in the Winter Olympics, at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. She was her nation’s flag bearer in the Opening Ceremony. Kalhor competed in the slalom and giant slalom competitions. She finished 60th among 86 competitors in the Giant Slalom and 55th among 87 participants in the Slalom.

Kalhor started skiing at the age of four, in Dizin, a ski resort in the Alborz mountain range, north of Tehran. At the age of eleven, she won a national competition, and later competed and won medals in Turkey and Lebanon. She has not yet competed in a World Cup event.

Sources: Wikipedia | Marjan Kalhor, zimbio.com

Female Iranian motor sports stars

At 28, Laleh Seddigh is known for her stunning looks and legendary driving skills…A PhD student from Tehran, she has been nicknamed “a little Schumacher” after the German Formula One champion. She has now been given the title of Iran’s best female racing driver.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/4349341.stm

Nora Naraghi is barred by her gender from taking a motorcyle out on Iran’s roads, but has defied discrimination to become the country’s motocross champion…Although women are banned from riding motorcycles on the streets in Iran, scenes of women riding pillion on motorbikes are not unusual.But unlike Saudi Arabia, which is also deeply conservative, they are allowed to drive cars. Some even drive buses and long-haul trucks.”
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/expat/expatnews/6857478/Irans-female-motocross-champion-gets-uphill-ride.html

“Iran’s female motorsports champion Zohreh Vatankhah
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/lipstick-revolution-irans-women-are-taking-on-the-mullahs-1632257.html?action=gallery
https://www.facebook.com/zohreh.vatankhah.1356

Christian football (soccer) players of Iran

Iran has had a history of integrating members of it’s Christian minority in the national football team. Just to focus on the better known names this small selection should be put forward:

Andranik EskandarianAndranik Eskandarian was born on December 31, 1951 in Tehran in an Armenian family. He became a United States citizen in 1984. Eskandarian was a member of the Iranian team winning the Asia Cup 1976 in Tehran and reaching the quarterfinals of the Olympic Tournament in Montreal in 1976. He also played for Iran in the 1978 World Cup. Ref: wikipedia.org

edbEdmond Bezik (born 12 August 1975 in Tehran, Iran) is a retired Armenian-Iranian footballer and coach. He played for Persepolis, Sepahan and Ararat Tehran and was a member of Iran national football team. Having scored 22 goals for Ararat, 32 goals for Persepolis and 30 goals for Sepahan, he scored a total number of 84 goals during his time in Iran’s top division football league, becoming the top division’s all-time top goalscorer. Ref: wikipedia.org

Andranik TeymourianAndranik Timotian-Samarani, born March 6, 1983 is an Iranian-Armenian footballer, more commonly known as Andranik “Ando” Teymourian. […] He played his first match for Iran in 2005, and has featured in Iran’s national squad for the 2006 FIFA World Cup and the 2007 and 2011 Asian Cups. He has played a total of 74 international matches, scoring 8 times. Ref: wikipedia.org

Iran and Iranian Jews today… Did you know?

“Tehran has 11 functioning synagogues, many of them with Hebrew schools. It has two kosher restaurants, and a Jewish hospital, an old-age home and a cemetery. There is a Jewish representative in the Iranian parliament.”
http://www.sephardicstudies.org/iran.html

“There are about 100 synagogues in Iran of which about 26 are in Tehran.”
http://www.iranjewish.com/Essay_E/Essay_e1.htm

“Despite the offence Mahmoud Ahmedinejad has caused to Jews around the world, his office recently donated money for Tehran’s Jewish hospital.

It is one of only four Jewish charity hospitals worldwide and is funded with money from the Jewish diaspora – something remarkable in Iran where even local aid organisations have difficulty receiving funds from abroad for fear of being accused of being foreign agents.

Most of the patients and staff are Muslim these days, but director Ciamak Morsathegh is Jewish.

“Anti-Semitism is not an eastern phenomenon, it’s not an Islamic or Iranian phenomenon – anti-Semitism is a European phenomenon,” he says, arguing that Jews in Iran even in their worst days never suffered as much as they did in Europe.”
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/5367892.stm